Monday, February 13, 2006

Si hoc legere scis, nimium eruditionis habes

Lots of things today that I'd like to tell you, but I can't. Bad luck.

However, a modicum of further progress on the Seat of Learning. Enough to make me go "ow" anyway. And then "blast", because out of nowhere a ruddy great dent has appeared on the front edge - exactly where it won't be naturally removed during the normal course of events. I'm am not happy. Certain people claim they "never touched it", but it looks like a "I'll just push this back out of the way a bit, oh what's that stopping it, I'll just shove a bit harder then" kinda mark to me... I've not taken a pic; it's too depressing.

But still, progress. It's not going to be a particularly deep seat I don't think, but then I never aimed for it to be so that's okay. I've still got to get to grips with the front edge either side of the pommel, but once that's done I shall enslave myself to the sander and hope that can solve all my problems. I don't like doing it, and I was going to shun it totally as I usually do, but using a card scraper is just not going to be an option really, is it? Looks kinda thick in the picture, doesn't it? Hmm, might have to worry about that for a bit now...

Finally, from a list of Useful Latin Phrases for Everyday Use, you may find the following handy if there's a trog with an ASBO near you:

Antiquis temporibus, nati tibi similes in rupibus ventosissimis exponebantur ad necem.

I think it may need a little practice to get it rolling off the tongue with the necessary fluidity, but worth the effort I feel. In case you can't be bothered to search for the translation, I'll reveal all tomorrow...

2 comments:

  1. Good Surname etc...2/14/2006 09:51:00 am

    Oh The power of Google!

    "In the good old days, children like you were left to perish on windswept crags".

    Just to make your thumbs worse; in days gone by, in Cornwall, children like that were known as "scrapings". Maybe short for "barrel scrapings" who knows!

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  2. Dunno about barrel scrapings, but didn't children used to get employed scraping arsenic out of chimmneys of some sort? Something like that lurks in the back of my mind. I'd go in and hoick it out, but I'm scared to go back there...

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