Saturday, September 02, 2006

Tag 'em and bag 'em

Well box them. Or something. How does one carry about half a dozen sharp handsaws without damaging them or me? Oh well. The tagging though, I've done. I figured even if I got cold feet and decided not to sell the Disstons I might as well bring 'em along for "educational purposes". Between all the saws there seems to be a nice cross-section of features; tooth count, age, handle shapes, you name it. The only thing is should I chuck in the unhappiest backsaw I have, which beautifully demonstrates two things you really, really want to avoid? Even as I'm typing this I'm thinking maybe yes...

Funny though, usually I find out the info about saws as they get bought of course; having them all together with all the info is a bit of an eye-opener. A number of my saws are a lot older than I give them credit for on a day-to-day basis, if you see what I mean. When you think of how easily they can be damaged beyond hope, largely in these parts from rust, you have to kind of marvel at a 150 yr old saw sailing through a 2x4 as if it'd had just come out of the factory. But unless you actually think about how old it is, it's just a frighteningly quick eater of wood. And I mean frightening. 5 1/2ppi crosscut is an evil-looking saw. Hmm, might have to put "sticking plasters" on the list too...

8 comments:

  1. If you do have room to chuck in the unhappy one, it would probably be very interesting to us learners - always good to know what to avoid. Take care not to cut yourself on the others - they sound super-sharp!

    Paul Chapman

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  2. Mike Wenzloff (MikeW)9/02/2006 04:09:00 pm

    ...always good to know what to avoid."

    Or how to correct it if hard earned dollars have been spent before one learns what to look for.

    Alf, it is amazing , isn't it? While we make new ones, I use some vintage tools to make them. Well, there are a couple I needed to make in order to make them, like the saw with a 16 thou sawplate with very little set so I can deepen 18 thou cuts in handles.

    But most of what I use are vintage tools, Even the ground down firmer for paring the bolt mortises is 150 years old. My Moulson, which gets used on about half the saws, is that old.

    And they all work as new. It is truly amazing.

    Have fun at the bash. It would be hard for me--at first--to let go of tools I have had for a time. Once it begins to happen, though, it is fairly liberating.

    Take care, Mike

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  3. "And they all work as new."

    Just think Mike, in about 100 years from now some woodworking bloggers will probably be writing that about your saws!

    Paul Chapman

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  4. If I'm spared I hope to be writing that about Mike's saws in at least 50 years time... :D

    Now, Mike, letting go of tools is "fairly liberating"? Don't make me larf. Who keeps mentioning in tones of regret that Preston smoother they sold, eh...? ;)

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  5. Mike Wenzloff (MikeW)9/03/2006 03:44:00 pm

    Ah, the Preston...I didn't say I was glad I sold all of them[g]. But it was a big ticket item and I needed the cash.

    And there are a couple others. Like the side rabbets. Needed them just last week. So I am going to make one along the lines of the Preston...

    But having less tools was a good feeling *after* the fact. Parting is such sweet sorrow and all that.

    Take care, Mike

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  6. Better to have loved and lost... :)

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  7. "Shiver"-all this talk of getting rid of tools is making me nervous ;)
    Philly

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  8. Alf, you surely need one of those saw 'quivers' that featured over on woodnet a while back... Run a search on 'saw till revisited' in the handtools forum.

    Pete (sorry he'll have to miss the shindig in Poole)

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